Slow, latent, and temperate virus infections. by Workshop and Symposium on Slow, Latent, and Temperate Virus Infections National Institutes of Health 1964.

Cover of: Slow, latent, and temperate virus infections. | Workshop and Symposium on Slow, Latent, and Temperate Virus Infections National Institutes of Health 1964.

Published by U.S. National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Blindness; [for sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. Govt. Print. Off.] in [Washington] .

Written in English

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Subjects:

  • Viruses,
  • Virus diseases,
  • Slow virus diseases,
  • Latent virus diseases

Edition Notes

Book details

StatementEdited by D. Carleton Gajdusek, Clarence J. Gibbs, Jr. [and] Michael Alpers.
SeriesNINDB monograph no. 2, Public health service publication no. 1378., Public Health Service publication ;, no. 1374.
ContributionsGajdusek, D. Carleton 1923- ed., Gibbs, Clarence J., 1924- ed., Alpers, Michael P., ed., National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQR360 .W66 1964
The Physical Object
Paginationxx, 489 p.
Number of Pages489
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL6008247M
LC Control Number66060991

Download Slow, latent, and temperate virus infections.

This book consists of the papers and discussions presented at a workshop-symposium sponsored by the National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Blindness, National Institutes of and temperate virus infections. book Robert M. Mcallister.

Genre/Form: Congress Conference papers and proceedings: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Workshop and Symposium on Slow, Latent, and Temperate Virus Infections. Full text Full text is available as a scanned copy of the original print version.

Slow Get a printable copy (PDF file) of the complete article (K), or click on a page image below to browse page by : George Le Bouvier. Get this from a library. Slow, latent, and temperate virus infections: Michael Alpers. [D Carleton Gajdusek; Clarence J Gibbs, Jr.; Michael Alpers;]. This review appears also in Trop.

Dis. Bull.,v. 64, ] This monograph is the record of a symposium held at the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, in December The formal papers are followed in most instances by the transcript of a discussion and at the end of the volume there are very useful bibliographies.

Among the diseases discussed are scrapie, kuru, visna, and. Held Dec. ; sponsored by the National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Blindness Includes bibliographical references Human nervous system disease of suspected viral etiology / Chairman, Hilary Koprowski -- Kuru in New Guinea and the origin of the NINDB Study of Slow, Latent, and Temperate Virus Infections of the Nervous System in Man / D.

Carleton Gajdusek -- Attempt to. Slow, Latent, and Temperate Virus Infections - CORE Reader. Book Notes | 1 December Slow, Latent, and Temperate Virus Infections. NINDB Monograph No. ‹ PREV ARTICLE; This Issue; NEXT ARTICLE ›. Full text Full text is available as a scanned copy of the original print version.

Get a printable copy (PDF file) of the complete article (K), or click on a page image below to browse page by page. Citation. Harter DH. Slow, Latent and Temperate Virus Infections. Arch Neurol. ;16(1) doi/archneur Download citation file.

Introduction The very first international working discussion on slow infections of the nervous system was entitled "Slow, Latent, and Temperate Virus And temperate virus infections. book tions" and was held at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in December The primary impetus was the discovery and investigation of kuru in New Guinea by D.

Carleton Gajdusek, M. Sorry, our data provider has not provided any external links therefor we are unable to provide a : E. Field. DC Gajdusek, CJ Gibbs Jr, M Alpers (Eds.), Slow, Latent and Temperate Virus Infections, National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Blindness, Washington (), pp.

Google Scholar 5. () Slow Latent and Temperate Virus Infections. Bethesda: National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Blindness.

OCLC SLOW, LATENT, AND TEMPERATE VIRUS INFECTIONS. NINDB MONOGRAPH No. Field EJ. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry, 01 Feb30(1): PMCID: PMC Review Free to read. Share this and temperate virus infections. book Share with email. STUDY OF SLOW, LATENT AND TEMPERATE VIRUS INFECTIONS OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM CAUSED BY CONVENTIONAL AND UNCONVENTIONAL VIRUSES, AND, MAINTENANCE OF A BREEDING COLONY OF RHESUS MONKEYS FOR INTRAMURAL RESEARCH Release Date: RFP AVAILABLE: NIH-NINDS P.T.

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and. †Director, Study of Child Growth and Development and Disease Patterns in Primitive Cultures, and of Laboratory of Slow, Latent and Temperate Virus Infections, National Institute of Neurological. A slow virus is a virus, or a viruslike agent, etiologically associated with a slow virus disease.A slow virus disease is a disease that, after an extended period of latency, follows a slow, progressive course spanning months to years, frequently involves the central nervous system, and in most cases progresses to es of slow virus diseases include HIV/AIDS, caused by the HIV virus.

Latent Infection. Not all animal viruses undergo replication by the lytic cycle. There are viruses that are capable of remaining hidden or dormant inside the cell in a process called latency. These types of viruses are known as latent viruses and may cause latent infections.

Viruses capable of latency may initially cause an acute infection. — Physical, chemical and biological properties of visna virus and its relationship to other animal viruses. In: Slow, latent and temperate virus infections, p. – Nat. Inst. Neurol. Dis. Blind. Monograph No. Public Health Service ( a).

Google Scholar. These slow-virus diseases have many peculiar features in common, including: very long incubation periods (months to many years); transmissible agents that are resistant to a wide range of viricidal treatments; an absence of detectable immunological responses to the agent, even using very sensitive tests 4; known lesions confined to the.

Many of the most common viruses stay in the body forever. These viruses are found in two stages: active and latent. Most of the time these viruses are latent.

This means that the virus is almost asleep. It produces only a few of its proteins, and replicates on a small scale. In fact, when the virus is latent, it is not causing the usual. These viral infections result in information of new viral particles and are called productive infections.

temperate phages: have the option of either directing a lytic infection or incorporating their DNA into the host cell genome. The latter situation is called a lysogenic infection, and the infected cell is a lysogen. Describe and give an example of an acute viral infection, a late complication following an acute infection, a latent viral infection, a chronic viral infection, and a slow viral infection.

Most viruses that infect humans, such as those that cause routine respiratory infections (e.g., cold viruses, influenza viruses) and gastrointestinal.

PRP is a very rare consequence of rubella virus infection and also results in mental and motor deterioration. The initial infection is usually congenital or soon after birth and the onset of PRP occurs at 8 to 19 years of age. The course of the disease may extend over many years. Other slow virus infections.

Human immunodeficiency virus and AIDS. Virus pathogens that establish latent infections have double-stranded DNA genomes that are replicated in the host nucleus and include herpesvirus, polyomavirus, papillomavirus, and adenovirus. All viruses that form latent infections have evolved one or many methods to avoid elimination by the host immune system.

The chapter discusses some of the many mechanisms employed by human. Chronic Infection- continuous production, of low levels of virus particles Latent Infections-viral genome (provirus) remians silent in host cell; cannot be eliminated and can later be reactivated • How a virus infection can lead to cancer.

While Gajdusek studied the disease in New Guinea, he teamed up with a virologist in the United States, Clarence Joseph Gibbs, to establish what they called the Laboratory of Slow, Latent and Temperate Virus Infections.

(2). Virus latency (or viral latency) is the ability of a pathogenic virus to lie dormant within a cell, denoted as the lysogenic part of the viral life cycle. A latent viral infection is a type of persistent viral infection which is distinguished from a chronic viral infection.

Latency is the phase in certain viruses' life cycles in which, after initial infection, proliferation of virus particles. Gajdusek, Daniel Carleton Born Sept. 9,in Yonkers, N.

American physician. Gajdusek graduated from the medical department of the University of Rochester in and studied at Harvard University from to He worked at the Pasteur Institute in Tehran in and at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research in Melbourne.

Slow virus infections are also known as prion diseases, after the presumed infectious agent, as well as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), after the histopathologic changes associated with these infections. Prions are proteinaceous infectious particles (PrPs).

The brain pathology of prion diseases consists of a vacuolar (spongiform) degeneration of the neuropil. Other articles where Temperate virus is discussed: virus: The cycle of infection: viruses, particularly bacteriophages, are called temperate (or latent) because the infection does not immediately result in cell death.

The viral genetic material remains dormant or is actually integrated into the genome of the host cell. Cells infected with temperate viruses are called lysogenic because the. Gajdusek and Clarence Joseph Gibbs, a virologist, established the Laboratory of Slow, Latent and Temperate Virus Infections inan early division of NIH.

Untold numbers of animals, including more than 1, nonhuman primates, many of which were chimpanzees, were infected with lethal TSEs such as CJD, GSS and scrapie. (6). Latent infections are common with other herpes viruses as well, including the varicella-zoster virus that causes chickenpox.

After having a chickenpox infection in childhood, the varicella-zoster virus can remain latent for many years and reactivate in adults to cause the painful condition known as “shingles”.

A more intimate virus-gene interrelationship in the form of a temperate infection has been postulated; however, little evidence exists at this time to support this hypothesis.

AB - Slow viral infections are characterized by a long incubation period, protracted clinical course, and limited host range. animal care and housing support services for study of slow, latent andtemperate infections of the nervous system caused by conventional and unconventional viruses nih guide, vol num j rfp available: nih-ninds p.t.

34 keywords: animal breed. While this study was in progress, preliminary accounts were given at the U. Department of Agriculture Scrapie Seminar, Washington, D. C., January 27–31, ; the 44th Annual Meeting of the Association for Research in Nervous and Mental Diseases, New York, N.

Y., December 4–5, ; and the National Institute for Neurological Disease and Blindness (National Institutes of Health. Initially inapparent (covert) viral infections in which an equilibrium between the virus and the host has been established. Pathology may occur periodically, or chronically at a low level.

If manifested in degenerative diseases of the central nervous system, these infections may result in death. Summary - Latent vs Persistent Viral Infection Latent infection is defined as the time from the onset of the infection to the appearance of virus extracellularly.

When the virus stays within the body of the host while continuously replicating and remaining infectious, that is termed as a persistent viral infection. Patient becomes clinically. In in collaboration with D. Carleton Gajdusek he established the Laboratory of Slow, Latent and Temperate Virus Infections.

In he demonstrated infection as the etiology of kuru and in of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, both subacute progressive degenerative brain diseases, resulting in the Nobel Prize for Medicine awarded to Dr.

Antibody to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus has been detected by the fluorescent antibody technique in mice in a state of persistent tolerant infection.

Slow, Latent, and Temperate Virus.Virus and rickettsial diseases, (Baltimore, Williams & Wilkins, ), by S. P. Bedson (page images at HathiTrust) Slow, latent, and temperate virus infections. _____ Viral infections where the virus remains in equilibrium with the host for long periods of time before symptoms again appear, but the actual viruses cannot be detected until reactivation of the disease occurs.

acute viral infection; chronic viral infection; latent viral infection; slow viral infection.

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